Horn Farm Happenings – March 18, 2022

Welcome Calyx Native Nursery!

You can expect to some new faces at the Horn Farm this spring. We welcome Calyx Native Plant Nursery to the Horn Farm Center’s network of on-farm partners.

Owned by Shawnna Lockwood and her husband Davis, Calyx Native Nursery is a newly established plant nursery that specializes in species native to the Mid-Atlantic region, including rare Threatened and Endangered Pennsylvanian species.

“We encourage responsible environmental stewardship to protect humans and wildlife alike,” says Shawnna. “We want to encourage others to plant native plants for our native pollinators and to assist in repairing delicate ecosystems and food webs with which they’ve co-evolved.”

We are pleased to partner with Calyx Native Nursery and to add to the diversity of offering at the Horn Farm Center. Their focus on environmental stewardship nicely complements the Horn Farm Center’s mission and values.

As part of our mission to connect soil, food, and people in ways that improve the health and resilience of our community, theHorn Farm Center supportsbio-regional economic development through our on-farm partnerships.

It began in 2010 with our Incubator Program, which provided land, infrastructure, marketing resources, and farm business training for new farm businesses. As our programs and organizational vision evolved, we transitioned our focus to hands-on training and education. Since then, we continue to partner on-site with a number of local farm-focused businesses, including:

For more information on On-Site Partnerships at the Horn Farm Center, please contact our Farm Manager, Andrew Horn at farmmanager@hornfarmcenter.org.

 


Join the Team: Now Hiring

Are you eager to contribute your talents to a mission that you are passionate about? We might have the right position for you! 

We are seeking enthusiastic, cooperative, and hard-working individuals to join our regenerative team. We are currently accepting applications for two positions:

  • Community Engagement Coordinator (Full-time or Part-Time)
  • Land Steward Assistant (Seasonal, Part-Time)

Click here to learn more.


Healthy Local Produce All Season Long

Your weekly box of organically-grown, farm-fresh produce awaits you!

The Horn Farm CSA runs 20 weeks from June through October. Each week offers seasonal, organically-grown produce. Here’s what you can expect:

  • Spring: lettuces, spinach, kale, swiss chard, spring onions, beets, herbs
  • Summer: kale, swiss chard, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, beets, summer squash, watermelon, cataloupe, onions, herbs, and more!
  • Fall: garlic, beets, turnips, winter squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes, kale, swiss chard, spinach

Pick-ups are at the Farm Stand located at 4945 Horn Road on Wednesdays from 2:30-6:30pm. 

Full Share:  $750
Half Share: $400

Click here to register.


Learning & Growing Together

On February 28th, we kicked-off the 2022 Land Stewardship and Ecological Gardener Training Programs with our “ecological core” classroom curriculum. Topics covered a broad history of the Earth, ecological succession and change over time, and an introduction to natural movement, observation skills, and base mapping.

Next week we will host our final classroom session before students begin their immersive hands-on training. We have an amazing group of participants and we are eager to spend 15 weeks learning and growing with them at the Horn Farm Center!

A special thanks to Hellam Township Administration for providing a clean, comfortable learning space for the classroom portion of the program.


Love the Land in Hellam Township

On Thursday, February 17, 2022,  Horn Farm Center’s Executive Director, Alexis Campbell and Board President, David Dietz, spoke out against the proposed development of 4974 Lees Lane, a property adjacent to the Horn Farm Center for Agricultural Education, at the Hellam Township Board of Supervisors meeting.

The proposal by Love’s Travel Stops includes developing and paving the 34.05 acre lot for the purposes of a truck convenience and travel stop in the northeast corner of U.S. 30 and Kreutz Creek Road, which would include a convenience store/fast-food restaurant building, a three bay tire shop, eight diesel fueling bays, six car fueling islands, 96 truck parking spaces and 75 car parking spaces.

The Horn Farm Center cited a list of concerns about the proposed project, particularly regarding the establishment of impermeable surfaces and fuel pollutants within close proximity to the Kreutz Creek, an area which regularly suffers from flooding and stormwater management issues, including major storm events in August 2018, August 2020, and September 2021.

Click here to read our official statement.


New Classes with Northern Appalachia School

Learn how to build cooperative relationships with plants that will enhance your well-being! We are pleased to welcome guest instructors, Calyx Liddick and Jaybird Tignor to the Horn Farm Center for an engaging series of plant walks and herb classes:

Plants as Teachers: Intuitive Communication – March 26, 2022 from 2pm-4pm
Plant Walk: Spring Plants – April 23, 2022 from 10am-12pm
Plant Walk: Herbal First Aid – May 21, 2022 from 10am-12pm
Foraged Tincture Making – June 18, 2022 from 10am-12pm

Our friends from Nothern Appalachia School will also be hosting a Spring Series of Botany for Foragers. In this series, instructors will discuss the form of plant parts (morphology), anatomy, terminology, and how to apply this information in the field to improve your plant identification skills.

Botany for Foragers: Leaves –  April 23, 2022 from 1pm-3pm
Botany for Foragers: Flowers – May 21, 2022 from 1pm-3pm
Botany for Foragers: Fruits – June 18th, 2022 from 1pm-3pm

Classes in the Botany for Foragers series can be taken individually or as a whole.

Love the Land in Hellam Township: Why We Do Not Support the Proposed Development of Our Neighboring Property

image courtesy of Mark Loucks

If you know our history, you will know how we feel about the proposal to develop our neighboring property into a Love’s Truck Stop.

The Horn Farm Center is a conservation success story. Born out of a successful community effort to save the farm from industrial development, the Horn Farm Center, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, was founded 18 years ago. Our local community understood that our natural spaces and cultural practices of stewarding and cultivating the land are sacred and need to be preserved. This belief, passionately enacted, saved the 186 acre farm.

Fast forward 15 years, and the Horn Farm Center is a thriving destination for outdoor learning and reconnection that serves more than 2,000 visitors and program participants from around our region each year. With a commitment to regenerative land stewardship, the Horn Farm Center has invested over $300,000 of public and private funds to restore the health of our soils and protect our local waterways, mainly the Kreutz Creek. In the past three years, staff and hundreds of volunteers have planted over 17,000 trees, which established 12 acres of native riparian habitat and protect over 2,000 lineal feet of waterways on our property. Our work continues with plans to actively restore 70 acres of woodland and productively reforest over 35 acres of farmland. 

Beyond serving our community, combating climate change, and creating a refuge for native wildlife, at the Horn Farm Center we do our part to meet Pennsylvania’s mandate (through the Chesapeake Bay Agreement) to reduce sediment loads in the Susquehanna River and Chesapeake Bay. 

Our vision for Hellam Township is one where we approach land use thoughtfully and base decisions upon the long-term health, well-being, and prosperity of our community. We are fortunate to have increasingly rare and beautiful, resource-rich natural lands and open space along the Route 30 corridor. More and more, people are drawn to Hellam Township for recreation precisely because of this precious rural atmosphere, and the community continues to build opportunities for visitors: the Lancaster Conservancy is in the process of opening up hundreds of acres of recently conserved natural lands to light recreational uses in the Hellam Hills and Wizard Ranch; the Susquehanna National Heritage Area is developing the Mifflin House property at Wrightsville into a regional heritage welcome center; and the Horn Farm Center is transforming county-owned land into a bio-regional destination for transformative experiences, ecological learning, and skill-building. We envision increased related business growth opportunities associated with such projects, as eco and heritage tourists opt to spend their dollars here. Likewise, surrounding property values can only benefit from these creative land uses that leave a light footprint on the landscape and offer a long-term net benefit to the community.

The proposed truck stop at the Kreutz Creek interchange stands in stark contrast to this vision and presents a number negative impacts:

2018 Flooding of Kreutz Creek, WPMT FOX43 facebook page, courtesy of Ryan Wallen

  • A 2020 Army Corps of Engineers Study identifies Kruetz Creek Tributary E as a flood hazard, with a 25-year flood event being the most frequent flood event that may cause damages to buildings. Surrounding this floodplain with 30+ acres of impervious surface is likely to exacerbate existing flooding and stormwater management issues. 
  • Trucking facilities where fuel is stored and dispensed, or where engine maintenance is performed, can pose a significant threat to nearby wells and groundwaters, streams, wetlands, ponds and lakes.One study found that contaminant levels in gas station runoff were 5- to 30-times higher when compared to residential runoff.
  • The use of highly-effective stormwater Best Management Practices to treat fuel facility runoff before it is infiltrated into the soil may resolve the threat, but only if a government agency regularly inspects these practices to ensure they are well maintained and independent reviews show a high degree of compliance.
  • Kreutz Creek Tributary E flows downstream into a section of Kreutz Creek that supports the natural reproduction of trout. Any asphalt proposed as part of the project will most certainly cause increased water temperatures downstream, potentially impacting the trout.
  • The trucking commerce that will profit Love’s will produce the unwanted byproduct of noise and air pollution, as well as increased traffic, adversely affecting the quality of life for surrounding residents – human and non-human alike. 
  • Commercial development of our neighboring farmland property conflicts with the Horn Farm Center’s efforts to preserve and protect farmland in Hellam Township through its conservation easement with the York Farm & Natural Lands Trust.
  • Heavy truck traffic lowers property value at a rate 150 times greater than cars.
  • Truck stops have been linked to concerns about crime increasing as well as sex trafficking, which is not only concerning for the neighborhood, but also for the visitors of all ages to the Horn Farm Center.

For these reasons listed above, the Horn Farm Center does not support the development of 4974 Lees Lane (Parcel#: 31-000-KK-0040.00-00000) for the purposes of a truck stop.

Sincerely, 

Horn Farm Center Board of Directors

Image: Joshua Bowling/The Republic https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/glendale/2020/05/23/loves-says-potential-glendale-truck-stop-not-done-deal/5244405002/

Image: CESO/Love’s Site Zoning Plan

Photojournalist Drew Szala – Rt. 30 at Kreutz Creek Rd. – Sept. 2018

Horn Farm Happenings – February 28, 2022

2022 CSA Registration Now Open

Since 2016, the Horn Farm CSA has been providing community members with weekly boxes of fresh, chemical-free vegetables and fruits.

This year, we are pleased to continue to offer the Horn Farm CSA in partnership with the Kilgore Family Farm and other local farms including York Fresh Food Farms and Green Bean Farm.

Regenerative Agriculture is more than just growing healthy food. Regeneration is about nurturing relationships – to the land, to ourselves, and to one another!

Reconnect this year by becoming a member of the Horn Farm CSA – supporting your health, local farmers, and the important work we do at the Horn Farm Center to steward the land and teach others to do the same.

The Horn Farm CSA runs 20 weeks from June through October. Each week offers seasonal, organically-grown produce. Here’s what you can expect:

  • Spring: lettuces, spinach, kale, swiss chard, spring onions, beets, herbs
  • Summer: kale, swiss chard, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, beets, summer squash, watermelon, cataloupe, onions, herbs, and more!
  • Fall: garlic, beets, turnips, winter squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes, kale, swiss chard, spinach

Pick-ups are at the Farm Stand located at 4945 Horn Road on Wednesdays from 2:30-6:30pm. 

Full Share:  $750
Half Share: $400

Click here to register.


Join the Team: Now Hiring

Are you eager to contribute your talents to a mission that you are passionate about? We might have the right position for you!

We are seeking enthusiastic, cooperative, and hard-working individuals to join our regenerative team. We are currently accepting applications for two positions:

  • Community Engagement Coordinator (Full-time or Part-Time)
  • Land Steward Assistant (Seasonal, Part-Time)

Click here to learn more.


seedlings ready for the heirloom plant sale

Horn Farm Center Plant Sale: May 7, 2022

Mark your calendars! The Horn Farm Center’s 10th Annual Plant Sale is Saturday, May 7th, 2022 from 9AM to 3PM!

This year’s sale will be an exclusively in-person event. Stop by and select from a wide variety of organically grown vegetable, herb, and flower starts. Newly added this year are grasses, herbaceous perennials, vines, trees, and shrubs.

The Horn Farm Plant Sale offers organically-grown plants from the Horn Farm Center and our growing partners: Kilgore Family FarmBetsy’s Flowers, and Calyx Native Nursery.  The event will also feature a number of local vendors.

While we are no longer offering online pre-sales, we put together an online catalog for those of you who enjoy browsing and planning in advance.

Click here to learn more.


A Sign of Health & Restoration

Recently, HFC Board Member and Master Watershed Steward, Cindy Pizziketti, caught a glimpse of this red-backed salamander along the creek banks at the Horn Farm. In addition to the joy of uncovering wildlife, finding amphibians like this salamander can be a good sign!

Salamanders are considered bio-indicators due to their sensivity to enviornmental change. With permeable skin, salamanders are like “environmental sponges” and tend to thrive in freshwater ecosystems with high water quality. Seeing this little critter is sign that all of our hard work to protect and restore the ecological health of our farmscape truly pays off.

 

 

 

 

 


Welcome New Intern, Logan Kline

Meet our newest team member, Greenhouse Management Intern, Logan Kline! Logan was born and raised in York, PA and graduated from Eastern York High School in 2018. He is currently a full-time student studying biology at Penn State York, with a specific interests in plant science and horticulture.

Previous work experience with larger regional plant distributors has driven him in the direction of self-sustainability, permaculture, and reconnecting with local natural environments. He spends his free time reading and studying as well as hammocking, hiking, and sightseeing when outdoors.

Logan will work with us for several hours a week until May, assisting our Farm Manager and land stewardship team with plant propagation and general greenhouse management.


Farmhouse Update: Building for a Better Future

Our Facilities Team is leading the effort to redesign and rebuild the Horn Farm Center’s historic farmhouse. Team members meet weekly and are currently working to engage a design and construction team that will help us reach our goals to build and expand in a way that is ecologically responsible and supportive of our organizational growth.

Some of our goals include:

  • Expanding our capacity to host large events and educational programs
  • Reducing our ecological impact and operational expenses through green building technologies
  • Designing for accessibility, adaptability, and growth with more office space, larger meeting rooms, a classroom space, storage, and public restrooms
  • Restoring and honoring the historic character of the building

In addition to rebuilding the farmhouse, our Facilities Team is working in partnership with our Board of Directors and staff to develop site and facilities plans that align with our ongoing evolutionary vision. We have lots of work to do! Stay tuned as we will continue to share our progress and seek your input along the way.

For questions, concerns, and insights, please contact us at info@hornfarmcenter.org.